Hub celebrates business with Perdue Farms

Representatives from Perdue Farms and Hub Labels gathered Wednesday for a ribbon-cutting ceremony celebrating their new business relationship. Written by Katiann Marshall
Hub Labels of Hagerstown celebrated the addition of a new press Wednesday morning due to its new business with Perdue Farms.
Thomas Dahbura, president of Hub Labels, said the relationship between the company, a custom manufacturer of pressure-sensitive and linerless labels, and Perdue is part of its new business strategy of doing business with other Maryland companies.
“Perdue is a Maryland company and for years, we’ve wanted to do business with Perdue and this opportunity allows us to,” Dahbura said.
Hub Labels’ 110,000-square-foot facility is off Shawley Drive in Hagerstown.
Perdue Farms is the parent company of Perdue Foods and Perdue AgriBusiness, based in Salisbury, Maryland. Perdue Foods is a major chicken, turkey and pork processing company in the United States.
This launch from Hub Labels is known as the “Made in Maryland” campaign.
“Maryland businesses doing business with other Maryland businesses,” Dahbura said. “There’s a sense of pride about being a Maryland company. So instead of buying something from Indiana or Texas, why not do business locally.”
Linerless labels are pressure-sensitive labels that do not have a liner or backing paper. The labels are wound on a roll that has had a release coating applied to the front of the face stock to prevent the adhesive from sticking on the label below.
This technology is a new project for Perdue, according to Dahbura.
“It’s new packaging technology rollout for Perdue, so there’s a lot of cool pieces of innovation here with this. We’re using linerless labels and Perdue is using this technology called vacuum seal, vacuum pack. That preserves the product for a longer period of time. The only way to decorate it is by using linerless labels,” Dahbura said.

Hub Labels is one of two companies in the U.S. that produces linerless labels and was the first company in the country to use that technology, according to Dahbura. He said he is happy to see the new technology starting to take off.
“It has started to come to fruition. You’ve got companies like Perdue using it … a lot of fish companies, Blue Apron. … A lot of companies are starting to adopt it,” Dahbura said. “When you get a company like Perdue to adopt this technology, it’s legitimizing the technology. It’s mainstream now. It has taken us about seven years to line this sort of business up because not a lot of people knew about it.”